GIS Data visualisation to explore potential correlations between the number of medicinal species used to treat snakebite, incidence of snakebites and cultural diversity.

Aim:

To explore if there is any association between the number of medicinal species used to treat snakebite and (a) incidence of snakebites, or with (b) cultural diversity in Central American Countries.

Methods:

I added 3 new attributes to the attribute table of a GIS shapefile with world countries represented as poligons: data about medicinal plants used to treat snakebite (Giovannini and Howes, 2017), linguistic diversity (Ethnologue, 2017) as a proxy for cultural diversity, and estimated incidence of snakebites in Central American countries (Gutierrez 2014). Then, I created a graduated scale by creating 5 classes of values range according to the quantile method and displayed the results on the map according to each country’s value for the corresponding attribute (Map 1: number of medicinal plants, Map 2: incidence of snakebite and Map3: linguistic diversity).

Map 1 (above): number of medicinal plants

Map 2 (above): incidence of snakebite

Map 3 (above): linguistic diversity as a proxy for cultural diversity

Results:

I found no evidence of an association between the number of medicinal species used to treat snakebite and the incidence of snakebites or cultural diversity in Central American Countries.

References:

Giovannini, P., Howes, M-J. R., (2017). Medicinal plants used to treat snakebite in Central America: Review and assessment of scientific evidence. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 199, 240-256.

Gutiérrez, J.M., 2014. Current challenges for confronting the public health problem of snakebite envenoming in Central America. J. Venom. Anim. Toxins Trop. Dis. 20 (7), 1-9.

Ethnologue, 2017: Ethnologue website, https://www.ethnologue.com/statistics/country